Vision of Hope

Nursing home care in Chino , Congregate home for brain injury 

Vision is one of nature’s great gifts.

It’s essential to safety, work, and living a meaningful life. But vision is often compromised when traumatic brain injury (TBI) occurs, leaving patients with deficits that require specialized clinical care.

Head trauma can cause serious vision impairments. It may also affect hearing, mobility, and may damage the vestibular and proprioception systems (which provide a sense of balance and spatial orientation). All these systems are interconnected with vision.

Other trauma-induced visual problems may include:

• Double-vision; limited field of vision
• Eyes that do not track objects correctly
• Uncoordinated eye and body movements
• Sensitivity to light; fatigue
• Poor depth perception
• Difficulty reading

1. FRONTAL LOBE:
Eye Movement Planning
2. PARIETAL LOBE:
Visuospatial Map,
Visual Attention
3. MIDDLE TEMPORAL LOBE:
Motion Perception
4. INFERIOR TEMPORAL LOBE:
Object Perception
5. MIDBRAIN:
Visual Orientation
and Eye Movements
6. BRAINSTEM:
Eye Movements Integrated
with Vestibular Input
7. CEREBELLUM:
Moderates Eye Movements
8. OCCIPITAL LOBE:
Shape, Contrast, Color